The Evolution of Dad

The Evolution of Dad


Then his movie deal stalled, his first son was born and he became a stay-at-home dad, raising Charlie, now 6, and then also Jamie, now 3, while his wife, Deborah, went to work each day as an interior designer. (The couple is expecting their third child in October.)

He loved the chance to be a hands-on father to his boys, he says, as opposed to the loving but often absent role model he had in his own father, a corporate lawyer. At the same time, he says, rewriting the norm meant that he “felt like a failure, and I felt alone, and yes, I’ll admit it, I often felt like less than a man.”

What does it mean to be a father today? Certainly not what it did in earlier generations, and probably not what it will mean a generation or so from now. Dads like Glazer are redefining the role, rejecting old expectations while still answering to them, knowing they don’t want the earlier model but not yet certain what the new model should be.

Glazer attempts to chart this shifting landscape in a documentary, “The Evolution of Dad,” which profiles fathers who are breaking the mold— a dad who has been home with his kids since the 1970s, a couple who splits child care, housework and breadwinning 50/50; a grandfather raising his young granddaughter on his own; a divorced lawyer who now works a four-day week so he can have 50 percent custody of his children. READ MORE